Holy Impatience

What may be needed when times call for courage is not peace and politeness, but, rather, some rough and tumble impatience. Perhaps it’s when we allow ourselves to get in touch with our angry impatience that we’re finally able to get in touch with our nerve.

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One Small Thing

Small actions x lots of people equals beg change

Don’t let anything or anyone flip us into a place of hopelessness . . . a place where we forget how beautiful, powerful and important we each are. For the sake of our world and the sake of our spirits, we must keep Martin Luther King Jr.’s vision of the Beloved Community in plain sight . . . a vision of a world filled with love, compassion and justice for all people.

 

And, I believe the only way to achieve this is for each of us – when we’re feeling frustrated, angry, discouraged or even faint – to look closely into our worried hearts and our upside-down faces and ask ourselves, “Have you considered doing something else?” And, then decide what our one small thing might be . . . and do it!

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Bending Toward Justice (MLK Sunday)

Despite our forward journey along the arc of the moral universe toward justice, we still have much to do. More than 150 years after the death of Theodore Parker, we are still living with oppressive laws. And nearly 50 years after the death of King, we still seem to be stuck in the mountains of materialism, racial injustice, indifference to poverty, and hate and violence. Parker and King might encourage us to get busy to help move our world along the arc of the moral universe. And, I believe we can start with something right in our own backyard.

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Letter to a Southern Baptist Pastor

Animals and Earth as the top of a tree being held up by four humans who form the trunk of the tree

E.O. Wilson writes, “If there is any moral precept shared by people of all beliefs, it is that we owe ourselves and future generations a beautiful, rich, and healthful environment.” In other words, regardless of who or what is our God, no matter whether we think Earth is 6,000 or 4.5 billion years old, we all share the common ground of our common planet.

So, let’s not stop our good individual efforts and advocacy for environmental sustainability. But, let’s also consider in the days ahead how we might reach out to those with whom we feel so far apart philosophically, religiously, and politically and come together around an environmental concern that is in all of our best interests.

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Hopefully Waiting

As we go from here, my hope for you and for me is that we will take inspiration from these stories of new houses and new commitments. My hope is that we’ll each continue to do our part for change and justice . . . knowing that, while we may have to wait on outcomes that we desire, we certainly don’t have to wait on taking action.

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The Gift of Hope

Toppled tree and destroyed homes after Joplin, MO tornado in 2011

It seems to me that hope doesn’t release us completely from anxiety or grief during our darkest times. Rather, hope’s gift is the feeling that we can go on in spite of our suffering. The answers to our questions are complicated details . . . . They can and must wait for another day.

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You’ve Got a Friend

May today and every day be the day that we’re grateful for the good friends we have, and the friends we’ve known. And may we always anticipate the ones we’ve yet to meet. More than any prayer or song, may it be our friends that connect us to the deepest part of ourselves and to that mystery that we may know as the spirit of Life.

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A Promise to Be Kind

No act of kindness no matter how small is ever wasted. Aesop

I have a strong feeling that Karen Armstrong is right – that kindness is the way to heal what divides us and build a global community in which all peoples can live together with mutual respect. As people of faith, my hope is that all of us here can be part of the solution . . . and that we will not fail what is perhaps the test of our time.

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We Who Defy Hate

Photo from jfr.org

Not all of us can do what Waitstill and Martha Sharp did to help others in need, which included turning their lives upside down and creating a brand new set of life priorities based on their most cherished values. However, in thinking about their story and the current refugee crisis that has exploded across Europe, Turkey and the Middle East, I’m nevertheless faced with the question of “What can I do?” “What does my faith compel me to do?”

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